Breastfeeding News Roundup

Breastfeeding News Roundup

Breastfeeding has been in the news a lot the last few weeks. Here’s a quick roundup of some of the most interesting and exciting new articles regarding our first food, and why it’s so important.

First, a viral post about the microbiology research of a Vicky Green, a Biosciences student at South Devon College, who demonstrated the power of breastmilk by placing it in petri dishes cultured with some of the nastiest bugs around, including MRSA and E. coli. In the picture in the link, you can actually see clear rings surrounding each drop of breastmilk on the petri dish where the bacterial growth was halted by the breastmilk proteins. What’s even more remarkable is that she’s using the breastmilk from a mum nursing a 15 month old and a mum nursing a 3 year old, which just goes to show that breastfeeding DOES continue to play an important and vital role in nourishing our children and providing optimal health for them well past the first 6 months of life. Unfortunately, as an IBCLC, I hear all too often from clients that they were told by a (presumably well-meaning) GP or Health Visitor that there’s no benefit to nursing a baby past 6 months. Absolute nonsense, as this research so clearly demonstrates! And who knows, perhaps the protein in breastmilk will hold the key to defeating bacteria like MRSA in the future.

And speaking of nursing babies beyond infancy, Tamara Ecclestone recently posted a lovely photoshoot of herself nursing her 2 year old daughter Sophia and just about broke the internet in terms of controversial backlash, as people reacted so negatively to the photos that she was actually forced to defend her decision for posting the photos in the first place. Which honestly is just a very sad state of affairs. Also, the BBC article linked above doesn’t provide 100% accurate information. UK guidelines for breastfeeding are in line with WHO guidelines, and state that babies should be breastfed exclusively for six months and then continue to be breastfeed for a minimum of 2 years OR BEYOND, in addition to the food they’re eating. For the record, the right time to wean is whatever feels right for mom and baby, but the biological norm for our mammalian species is to breastfeed for anywhere from 2-3+ years, and as with all phases of growth or development, there’s a huge range of normal in terms of the right time to wean depending on the mother and baby dyad. It’s irresponsible to suggest that the UK guideline only encourages breastfeeding for the first 6 months. As for the controversy, unfortunately that’s nothing new. People are often outraged by the thought of breasts being used for purposes *other* than sexual, and sadly we hear of stories all the time of women being shamed for nursing in public, or told to use the toilet instead. And not surprisingly, most likely due in part to these cultural perceptions, the UK has one of the worst rates of extended breastfeeding of any developed nation in the world–even lower the the US’ rate of extended breastfeeding, which is quite surprising given that women in the UK routinely have 6 months of maternity leave (and often a year) compared to women in the US who often receive a scanty 6 weeks, if they’re lucky enough to receive anything at all. Clearly there’s still A LOT of room for improvement, and personally, as someone who’s still nursing her own two year old, I applaud Tamara Ecclestone’s decision to share her beautiful photos, which is an important part of how we can begin to normalize breastfeeding in the first place. The Milk Meg also has a wonderful article on this entitled: 9 Reasons my child is not “too old” to breastfeed.

And finally, this is a fascinating article┬áby Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, IBCIC (who I saw at the LCGB conference last year, and is a fantastic speaker), discussing all of the ways that breastfeeding doesn’t just provide the optimal food for our babies, but also provides the best emotional and neurological foundation for their mental health. Breastfeeding encourages responsive parenting, promotes sleep (which in turn supports better parenting, as well as lowering the risk of postnatal depression–and breastfeeding is an independent factor for reducing maternal depression as well, regardless of sleep). Breastfeeding also promotes nurturance, attachment and bonding. As I often tell clients, breastfeeding is 10% about the FOOD we’re feeding our babies (and what incredible food it is!) and 90% about THE MANNER in which we’re feeding our babies, setting them up for healthy brain growth, emotional processing and psychological attachment in addition to optimal nutrition.

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